Monday, 23 April 2018

Wednesday, 10 January 2018

Artist Reception and Q+A – tomorrow, January 11, 2018

The Hospital Club presents The Baldwin Gallery’s Betwixt, exploring the organic and psychic transference between selves and species, featuring the shape-changing photography of David Ellingsen and Meryl McMaster.
The Hospital Club presents The Baldwin Gallery’s Betwixt, exploring the organic and psychic transference between selves and species, featuring the shape-changing photography of David Ellingsen and Meryl McMaster.

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Private View: January 11th, 2018

The Hospital Club, 24 Endell St, London WC2H 9HQ

The Hospital Club presents The Baldwin Gallery’s Betwixt, exploring the organic and psychic transference between selves and species, featuring the shape-changing photography of David Ellingsen and Meryl McMaster.

Of indigenous and European descent, Plains Cree sculptural-photographer, McMaster, pits delimiting identities – Native American, Canadian, female, human – against the immediacy of her lived body in the natural world. She expresses heritage and contemporaneity as a synergistic strength of unities, rather than a struggle between opposites.

Ellingsen’s Anthropocene series is inspired by the proposed renaming of our geological epoch, as Earth’s systems are irrevocably altered by human activity. Transmuted skeletal remains, adrift on blackness, reference future and past and are both a warning and rendering of hope.

Both artists have shown in museums around the world, from The Beaty Biodiversity Museum, Canada, and the Datz Museum of Art, South Korea (Ellingsen), to the Smithsonian and the Art Gallery of Ontario (McMaster).

Monday, 1 January 2018

Weather Patterns 2017

2017, a new addition to weather patterns, an on-going visual diary of climate breakdown

 

Photographed the last day of another year yesterday and here is 2017, a new addition to Weather Patterns, an on-going visual diary of climate breakdown.

The years 2017, 2016 and 2015 make up the 3 hottest years on record for the planet. 2016 and 2015 were El Nino years and to have 2017, in which El Nino was absent, join the others in the top 3 illustrates the relentless pace of climate breakdown.

Also emerging in this work is evidence of the record-breaking forest fires here in the Pacific Northwest. Note the yellow cast to many of the photographs about two-thirds of the way down the work.

Last June an article appeared in The Guardian titled “World has three years left to stop dangerous climate change”. Reporting on a warning letter from prominent climate experts, this now gives us 2.5 years from this new year’s day. If we hope to still have a planet hospitable to life by the end of this century the time for action is now. There are solutions prepared and plans made to meet this challenge and we must demand that our representatives in government put them into action.

Thursday, 30 November 2017

Remembrance Day for Lost Species

November 30 is Remembrance Day for Lost Species

Here’s a small collection of recent creature portraits, photographed in collaboration with the Beaty Biodiversity Museum, all in danger of joining the ranks of lost species.

Polar Bear, African Elephant, Kiwi, Boreal Chorus Frog, Caribou, Echidna, Mouse Deer, Snapping Turtle and the Pangolin (the most trafficked creature on the planet).

African-Elephant-Loxodonta-africana
African Elephant
Boreal Chorus Frog art photograph endangered sixth extinction
Boreal Chorus Frog
echidna art photograph endangered sixth extinction
Echidna
kiwi art photograph endangered sixth extinction
Kiwi
mouse deer art photograph endangered sixth extinction
Mouse Deer
polar bear art photograph endangered sixth extinction
Polar Bear
snapping turtle art photograph endangered sixth extinction
Snapping Turtle
pangolin art photograph endangered sixth extinction
Pangolin
Caribou-Rangifer-tarandu
Caribou

Wednesday, 11 October 2017

Saturday, 1 July 2017

The Last Stand at Natuurmuseum, Netherlands

Nine photographs from The Last Stand appear today in this exhibition at the Nature Museum in Leeuwarden. The Noorderlicht Photography Festival is curating a group of projects on the ecosystem, with the umbrella title ‘Guardians’. The first in the series Plastic: Fossil to Fossil opened in April with work from, among others, Mandy Barker and Chris Jordan.

“The exhibition series GUARDIANS examines the influence of humans on the biodiversity that surrounds us. This second part looks at what we extract from nature. With both plants and animals, the preservation of biodiversity is under pressure. Chemical contamination is causing the seedbed for flora and fauna to disappear. Economic exploitation of the land is resulting in deforestation. These and other causes mean that an untouched natural ecosystem is now nowhere to be found. This is exposed in the exhibition BEES ’n TREES by way of two specific species: bees and trees.”
– Noorderlicht Photography Festival

Bees and Trees
July 1 – August 30, 2017
Natuurmuseum Friesland & Noorderlicht Photography Festival
Leeuwarden, NetherlandsNine photographs from The Last Stand appear in this exhibition at the Nature Museum in Leeuwarden. The Noorderlicht Photography Festival is curating a group of projects on the ecosystem, with the umbrella title 'Guardians'. This second exhibition in the cycle, Bees and Trees, focuses on two species -one big, one small- as examples of man’s influence on biodiversity.

The Last Stand appear in this exhibition at the Nature Museum in Leeuwarden. The Noorderlicht Photography Festival is curating a group of projects on the ecosystem, with the umbrella title 'Guardians'. The first in the series Plastic: Fossil to Fossil opened in April with work from, among others, Mandy Barker and Chris Jordan. This second exhibition in the cycle, Bees and Trees, focuses on two species -one big, one small- as examples of man’s influence on biodiversity.

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, 29 June 2017

Thursday, 11 May 2017

Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Wednesday, 5 April 2017