Thursday, 10 September 2015

Recent work for Weather Patterns – 400ppm

400 part per million, March 2015
400 part per million, March 2015

400ppm, March 2015
Edition of 5
Pigment ink on cotton rag.
30×54 inches.

Recent work for the on-going project Weather Patterns.

Figures released by the US science agency NOAA for March, 2015 show that for the first time since records began the parts per million (ppm) of CO2 in the atmosphere were over 400 globally for an entire month. This concentration has not occurred in over a million years.

This grid illustrates the 16 days photographed in March 2015, multiplied by 25, in order to mark this milestone event with a work of 400 parts.

Project Notes:
Initiated in 2011, Weather Patterns is a long term project visually archiving climate trends and events in Canada’s Pacific Northwest.

Thursday, 3 September 2015

New work – The Hottest in Recorded History (Global), July 2015

July 2015, Hottest on Record, Global

The Hottest in Recorded History (Global), July 2015
Edition of 5
Pigment ink on cotton rag.
30×54 inches.

New work for the on-going project Weather Patterns.

Globally, the month of July 2015 was the hottest in recorded history to date. This grid of 30 contains the 14 days photographed in July. The remaining days are each represented by a composite of vertical sections of those same 14 days.

Project Notes:

Initiated in 2011, Weather Patterns is a long term project visually archiving climate trends and events in Canada’s Pacific Northwest.

The compilations realize collections of days as a single work, enabling the viewer to see wide swaths of these historical records…such as a month or a year…in one glance. Both local and global events are represented with some groupings compiled for conceptual reasons and others as pure archival data in order for visual trends to emerge over time.

Process
With the camera pointed due west, the photographs are captured in person at high tide from the following location on Cortes Island in British Columbia; Lat: 50° 1′ 10.5882″ Long: -124° 59′ 43.6452″.